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Unconventional relationships, positive marginalities and citizenship

Author:

Alessandro Pratesi

Universitat de Chester, GB
About Alessandro

Alessandro Pratesi és professor titular (professor associat) de sociologia a la Universitat de Chester (Regne Unit). És membre de la Xarxa d'Investigació de la Sociologia de les Emocions de l'Associació Europea de Sociologia (ESA, per les sigles en anglès) i autor de nombroses publicacions en l'àrea de la cura d'altres, les emocions i les relacions. En l'àmbit de la investigació, els seus interessos se centren en la sociologia de les emocions; la cura i l'ètica de la cura d'altres; les relacions, intimitats i famílies; la migració, ciutadania i el canvi social i els mètodes qualitatius innovadors, entre d'altres. En el seu llibre, recentment publicat, captura de forma articulada tots aquests interessos: Doing Care, Doing Citizenship. Towards a Micro-situated and Emotion-based Model of Social Inclusion, Palgrave Macmillan (Link). Hardcover ISBN 978-3-319-63108-0. DOI 10.1007 / 978-3-319-63109-7.

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Abstract

Long distance relationships and caring at a distance may be connected with emotional and psychological exhaustion but also gratification, reward and empowerment; above all, they possess important implications in terms of social justice, equality and citizenship. The expression ‘world families’ (Beck and Beck-Gernsheim, 2014) includes a heterogeneous and tension-filled set of social actors who have in common the potential to bridge traditional distinctions between public and private, centre and periphery, national and international, able-bodied and physically/cognitively impaired, heterosexual and homosexual, bypassing dichotomous ideas of inclusion/exclusion which typically characterise the concept of citizenship. These families represent a group of very different social actors, including couples of mixed cultures and ethnicities, low-paid migrant workers, skilled migrant workers, asylum seekers, refugees, distant families, etc. who challenge our culturally homogenous understanding of family and society and are defined therefore as ‘pioneers of cosmopolitanism’ and cultural diversity.
Drawing on recent work on families, relationships, intimacies and caring for distant others and contextualising it within the specific and still unexplored context of Living Apart Together (LAT) same-sex couples, this article examines the moral, sociological and institutional geographies of these less visible chains of care and affection and their unequally entitled rights and visibility. The literature review is combined with auto-ethnographic work analysing and discussing the case of a married, same-sex, transnational, Living Apart Together (LAT) couple.
This article suggests that by looking at what happens at the level of emotion-based, micro-situated interactions we can get some crucial insights into the changing nature of families, intimacies and relationships and their multiple implications in terms of social inclusion, entitlement to rights/citizenship and social change. It is a form of relational, emotion-based and micro-situated social inclusion and entitlement to rights/citizenship which is occurring, on a daily basis, in the interstices of people’s interactions even when such change still meets several obstacles at the structural, political and institutional level.
How to Cite: Pratesi, A., 2018. Unconventional relationships, positive marginalities and citizenship. Digithum, (22), p.None. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7238/d.v0i22.3130
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Published on 21 Aug 2018.
Peer Reviewed

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